Thursday, July 3, 2014

Statue of Liberty, A Thing of the Past?

Over the last couple of weeks, I’ve noticed the topic of immigration has resurfaced again through a variety of streams.  There seems to be a new sort of harshness in the voices of many.  I’m conflicted about what to think about the situation and a little troubled by some of the things I’ve read by American Christians.  I don’t want to repeat a blog I wrote about a year ago titled Misericordia Por Favor, which is translated “Mercy Please” in English, but I can’t help but to resurface this discussion.

It strikes me as sort of funny that I’m thinking about this on July 3, the day before we celebrate the founding of our nation and as I’m preparing to teach on the letter of First Peter which carries the theme of living as aliens throughout it’s entirety.  How should Christians respond to these children that our government is trying to handle?  To be honest, I’m not sure that I know the answer.

I guard myself from getting political.  We as Christians are called to submit to our authorities.  Thankfully in the USA, that means we are encouraged to vote and voice our concerns to our representatives.  I’m not sure of all the facts, but it seems something politically was said, or done, that is encouraging people to send their children hundreds, really thousands of miles, alone to enter the USA.  Is it okay to respond to our leaders about this situation?  Sure, I really don’t see a problem with that as a Christian.

However, as a Christian, as an American, I have concerns for how these people are being treated by my fellow countrymen.  I have never been in a situation where I have wanted to flee from my homeland.  I can’t even begin imagine that I would ever load up my four children and send them to another country without me.  Take a moment to ponder how bad the situation would have to be for you as a parent to think sending your children away, possibly never to see them again, to another country by themselves because there was hope of a better life.  I can’t ever imagine being in this place.  It makes me sick to my stomach just pondering being in a position where this would be the best option for my family.

Are you aware of the quote on the Statue of Liberty?  I believe it’s a good word for us to ponder as Americans.  The quote reads: “Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, the wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed, to me: I lift my lamp beside the golden door.”  Is this still true of our nation, or is it time to remove the quote?

1 comment:

Anonymous said...

Good thoughts; I have some of the same concerns as you. I do recall that the quotation you mention was a poem written after the statue was placed and, according to Paul Auster,"Bartholdi's gigantic effigy was originally intended as a monument to the principles of international republicanism, but the poem 'The New Colossus' reinvented the statue's purpose, turning Liberty into a welcoming mother, a symbol of hope to the outcasts and downtrodden of the world".

My other thought is that if doing good for the masses now renders the U.S. incapable of doing more good because of the high cost we are and will be paying, is it still good?
--Mary Alice